Rastafarian Patois Lexicon - Sayings

Rastafarian Patois Lexicon - Sayings

Rastafarian Patois Lexicon - Sayings


Hello dear Dreadbag friends,

Today we would like to introduce you to our small but fine Rastafari "Jamaica" Patois lexicon. Here you will find a lot of Jamaican Patois vocabulary or translations from A to Z. All Rastafari / Patois translations have been translated by us into English. We have added a lot of Jamaican Patois phrases, so that you can better / more understand or even understand it on your next Jamaican vacation or stay. That's not easy sometimes! Our tip: Do not hesitate to ask again if you have not understood everything the first time. Just say you are interested in the country of Jamaica and the language Patois and would like to learn Patois better. No Jamaican or Rastafarian will tear you off and if you're lucky you'll learn a few "funny" new Patois phrases from them. 😉 We hope you enjoy reading, learning and of course the next Jamaica vacation / stay. Jamaica is gorgeous - rejoice in Jamaica! We love Jamaica! 🙂

Blessed love - Your Team Dreadbag

Photos by Chris Wandel (Help Jamaica!) - Click here for our complete >>> Rastafari - Patois Lexicon

Rastafarian - Patois Dictionary - Last Update - 10 / 02 / 17

A B D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z


A

: prep. to as in "go a shop," from Spanish (7)
A GO : aux w / v. going to do, as in "Me a go tell him" (7)
A DOOR : outdoors. (5)
Accompong : n. name of Maroon warrior, Capt. Accompong, brother of Cudjo; So name of town. From the Twi name for the supreme deity (7)
Ackee : n. African food tree introduced about 1778. From Twiankye or Kru akee (7)
AGONY : the sensations felt during sex (6)
AKS : ask (28)
ALIAS : adj. (urban slang) dangerous, violent (7)
AMSHOUSE : poorhouse (29)
AN : than (5)
ARMAGEDDON : the final battle between the forces of good and evil (1)
ASHAM : n. Parched, sweetened, and ground corn. From twiosiam (7)

BABYLON

: 1. the corrupt establishment, the "system," Church and State 2. the police, a policeman (1)

Jah Rastafari! - The roots of reggae - documentation

Jah Rastafari! - The roots of Reggae (54 Min.)

Jah RastafariThe documentation goes on track searching and decodes the codes of the Reggae, which go back to the black liberation movements of the last century. For this, filmmaker Tim Gorbauch in Kingston, Jamaica and the Rototom Sunsplash Festival in Spain meet young and old Roots reggae musicians, cultural scientists, historians and Rastafarian activists.

When asked what is connected with reggae, one almost always gets the same short answers: Bob Marley, Kiffen, dreadlocks, Jamaica and a somewhat relaxed life. In fact, all this is essential to reggae. The question is, however, why? What does smoking of marijuana have to do with reggae? What is the meaning of dreadlocks apart from style and fashion? Why was it all on the Caribbean island of Jamaica? "Jah Rastafari! The roots of the reggae "goes on track searching and decodes the codes of the Reggae, which go back to the black liberation movements of the last century.

For this, filmmaker Tim Gorbauch in Kingston, Jamaica and the Rototom Sunsplash Festival in Spain meet young and old Roots reggae musicians, cultural scientists, historians and Rastafarian activists. Musicians like the guitarist Earl "Chinna" Smith, who was involved in hundreds of Reggae albums and played together with Bob Marley and the Wailers. Stranger Cole, a legend of the Rocksteady and Ska era, the indomitable DJ, toaster and singer Big Youth.

But also young musicians like Addis Pablo, the son of the legendary Augustus Pablo, Kabaka Pyramid, Chronixx and Jah9. They all belong to the young but very effective movement of the reggae revival, which has brought the Roots reggae back into the limelight for a few years.

Have fun watching ...

Your Dreadbag team

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